Category: two-face

Review: Detective Comics #993

Review: Detective Comics#993

[Editor’s Note: This review may contain spoilers]

Writer: James Robinson

Artist: Carmine Di Giandomenico

Colors: Ivan Plascencia

Letters: Rob Leigh

Summary

Two-Face…dead?! Did the multifaceted mafioso really get killed in a massive explosion? Batman’s the detective—let HIM figure it out! And that’s just what the Caped Crusader sets out to do, because something’s fishy about Dent’s latest…

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DC’s Artist Alley Figures to Feature Unique St…

DC’s Artist Alley Figures to Feature Unique Style From James Groman

Prolific designer toy artist Jame Groman, best known for the Madballs toy series, is bringing his twisted and grotesque designs, recently released his designs of Batman and the Rogues Gallery.  It will be a part of the upcoming DC Artist Alley designer vinyl collaboration with DC Collectibles, and will feature unique renderings of Batman, Killer Croc, Joker, and Two Face.

The figures will be…

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Regular

[Editor’s Note: This review may contain spoilers]

Writer: James Robinson

Artist: Carmine Di Giandomenico

Colors: Ivan Plascencia

Letters: Rob Leigh

Summary

Batman’s newest partner is…Two-Face? As Harvey Dent’s persona asserts fragile control over the villain’s psyche, the Dark Knight, Commissioner Gordon and their ally-turned-enemy-turned-ally must work together to stop Kobra’s terrorist attack against Gotham City.

Positives

Within the first few panels, we get to see the Harvey Dent side of Two-Face finally speak to Batman as an old friend versus an enemy, which is a breath of fresh air in the constantly changing circus that is Batman’s rogues gallery. He has more than a complex relationship with each of them, making him not only one of the best and most complex characters in the DC Universe, but also in all of comics, and his relationship with Two-Face is one of the more enigmatic. with his most beloved ones, of course, being The Joker and Catwoman. However, it is his relationship with Two-Face that proves to be quite different, as he is reunited with an old friend, and not just another villain.

The way Di Giandomenico illustrates Two-Face in this issue is utterly extraordinary. His art style is phenomenal, but within this particular issue he pushes the point that we are looking at a wholly different version of Two-Face, the Harvey Dent version that Bruce Wayne has not seen for a very long time. We also get a very awkward scene between Jim Gordon, Two-Face and Batman, where three very dominant personalities try to one-up each other in what becomes quite an intriguing conversation between these three iconic characters.

In the final scene, Commissioner James Gordon gives the reader the information as to just how deep Kobra is embedded throughout Gotham and to what lengths they will go to keep their operatives silent, even when captured, noting to both the reader and his current audience of Batman and Two-Face, the severity of this new player in Gotham.

Negatives

There are no negatives worth mentioning in this issue.

Verdict

This issue explains the setup from the previous issue and gives us a glimpse of what is yet to come. The story by Robinson is fun, action packed and probably some of the best pages of dialogue that I have ever read in comics. The art by Di Giandomenico is pretty awesome, as it both evokes nostalgia and is a style all its own. Overall, an exciting issue that comic book readers can fall right into, and not miss a beat.

Review: Detective Comics#991

Writer: James Robinson Artist: Carmine Di Giandomenico Colors: Ivan Plascencia Letters: Rob Leigh Summary Batman’s newest partner is…Two-Face?

Review: Detective Comics #990

Review: Detective Comics#990

[Editor’s Note: This review may contain spoilers]

Writer: James Robinson

Artist: Stephen Segovia

Colors: Ivan Plascencia, Allen Passalaqua

Letters: Rob Leigh

Summary

Batman is hot on the trail of a murder suspect, but first he’ll have to get past Two-Face. Even though Harvey Dent seems to be asserting control, how long before he becomes a sociopathic criminal once again? More importantly, what…

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Regular

[Editor’s Note: This review may contain spoilers]

Writer: James Robinson

Artist: Stephen Segovia

Colors: Ivan Plascencia

Letters: Rob Leigh

Summary

Fighting off Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum and two versions of the pyro-maniac Firefly shouldn’t be too difficult for Batman…but the real threat comes from the fact that they’re pairs! For some reason, Two-Face doesn’t want Batman to discover the truth behind the murder he’s investigating…but what’s his angle?

Positives

The first few panels of this particular issue finds Batman and Alfred having a meeting of the minds. We not only get to marvel at how intelligent Bruce Wayne/Batman is, but also at just how astute Alfred Pennyworth is, as through most of his canon, he has served as the Wayne family butler, but in this particular scene, the character is more of brain trust, someone both Batman and Bruce Wayne can bounce ideas off of and to bring new ideas to the table.

In the second scene, we find out that Firefly has a protégé, which, for the first time in a while, takes Batman off his game. He has always dealt with one Firefly, but two of them definitely has him thinking both offensively and defensively, as this is what makes Batman’s intelligence so appealing to other characters and readers alike. We get to see how his brain works, as he never tends to act emotionally but logically in almost all his actions, even when villains try to get a rise out of him, like the many times the Joker has attempted this.

In a moment of levity in the book, during a typical meeting between Commissioner James Gordon and Batman near the Bat Signal, Gordon is both astounded and riled up at the fact that Batman has found out more about a crime than the police have, as he makes a rare musical reference, something I have never seen in this book until Robinson took over, as we are reminded that Gotham is still part of the larger world.

In the final scene, we see Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum have a hostage tied up, one that Batman manages to free, only to find out that the person behind all of this is actually Two-Face, which is something that readers get to unpack in the next issue.

Negatives

There are no negatives worth mentioning in this issue.

Verdict

This issue continues the arc set by Robinson and Segovia, which looks to be part of a bigger scheme that Two-Face has setup. The story by Robinson definitely feels like a crime procedural, one that can almost be an episode of Law & Order, as the story grind at the details like most procedural dramas until you get a breakthrough like most crime TV shows do. The art by Segovia continues to be stellar, which is more than enough reason to re-read this book more than once. Overall, an engaging second installment in what looks to be a very interesting story.

Review: Detective Comics#989

Writer: James Robinson Artist: Stephen Segovia Colors: Ivan Plascencia Letters: Rob Leigh Summary Fighting off Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum and two versions of the pyro-maniac Firefly shouldn’t be too difficult for Batman…but the real threat comes from the fact that they’re pairs!

Regular

Full offense but The Joker is THE most boring, one-dimensional batman villain… We’ve got so many genuinely compelling villains with unique personality traits & backgrounds in Gotham’s rogues gallery and yet that ugly ass clown wearing 99¢ lipstick gets all the credit. IM SICK

Regular

Batman is not short of villains, by any means, when it comes to saving Gotham City.  Recently, James Robinson was given the task of writing an arc of Detective Comics, and when choosing a villain, he chooses his favorite, Harvey “Two-Face” Dent.  Robinson is aware that the “twists and turns” of Two-Face have been explored before, so he is looking to write the character from a different angle; an angle which includes adding Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum and a different version of Firefly to the mix.

Before the start of his run with Detective Comics on September 12th with issue #988, he spoke about his approach to Two-Face and why he is excited to write the character again.

“I’ve written a lot of Batman.  People forget that I’ve written a lot of Legends of Dark Knight and I wrote Batman: Face the Face, which was a Two-Face story that I did right after One Year Later.  He’s (Two-Face) my favorite DC character, so I’m going to always want to involve Two-Face in some capacity if I can, if I can, it’s the right idea and the right story.”

Robinson explained the beginning of his love for both Batman and Two-Face:

“Every since when I was a kid, finding a second-had 100 page Batman comic that was all three of the Two-Face stories.  People forget that, where the Joker and Catwoman and the Penguin were Batman villains that began in the 1940s and appeared throughout the entire run of the comic, Two-Face was done in three 10-page stories.  Then he was cured at the end of it.  Harvey Dent had a happy ending with his girlfriend.”

When asked about his pitch to write Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum, Robinson added:

“I was talking to my editor, Chris Conroy, who’s fantastic, by the way.  He’s one of the best editors that I’ve had.  And I told him that I wanted to write Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum a little bit.  He was like, those guys are so dumb.  And I was like, no, no, no, I remember Brian Azzarello making them really cool and creepy.  I want to do something like that.  And he was like, oh, OK, yeah, yeah, yeah.  So there’s a little bit of them in it.”

In closing, Robinson spoke to the fans and told them what to expect in his arc for the upcoming run in Detective Comics:

“It’s an action packed, visually-dynamic mystery involving Two-Face, the Fireflies, and a little bit of Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum.  And we’ll get into the whole dichotomy of the schism of Two-Face and Harvey Dent.  I know that stuff has been mined and used by a lot of writers, but it’s always fun to have a go at doing that.”

So there you have it, multiple Fireflies, some Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum, and an amazing take on Two-Face from one of the greatest writers inside DC Comics.

James Robinson Chooses His Detective Comics Villain

Batman is not short of villains, by any means, when it comes to saving Gotham City.  Recently, James Robinson was given the task of writing an arc of…

‘The Batman’ To Take Quest From Frank Miller’s…

“The Batman” To Take Ques From Frank Millers Year One

So much has swirled around the upcoming DCEU Batman solo film that we don’t know what’s up and what’s down!

More rumors have surfaced saying director Matt Reeves will base his film on Frank Millers famed “Year One” story arc. Loved by fans and critics alike, the story revolves around the very first quest the Caped Crusader embarks on to rid Gotham’s streets of scourge and villainy.

Before this…

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JOSE LADRONN

JOSE LADRONN

Batman vs Rogues by Tiago Datrinti

Batman vs Rogues

by Tiago Datrinti